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Friday, May 15, 2020 | History

3 edition of Neural correlates of social behavior in nonhuman primates found in the catalog.

Neural correlates of social behavior in nonhuman primates

Jean Balch Williams

Neural correlates of social behavior in nonhuman primates

a bibliography, 1965-1984

by Jean Balch Williams

  • 273 Want to read
  • 19 Currently reading

Published by Primate Information Center, Regional Primate Research Center, University of Washington in Seattle .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Brain -- Bibliography,
  • Primates -- Bibliography,
  • Social Behavior -- Bibliography

  • Edition Notes

    StatementJean Balch Williams.
    GenreBibliography.
    SeriesPrimate Information Center topical bibliographies -- 84-018
    ContributionsUniversity of Washington. Primate Information Center.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination9 p. ;
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14753942M
    OCLC/WorldCa11378906

    Shepherd and Freiwald examine the neural correlates of communication in monkeys during simulated social interaction, discovering networks in the monkey brain for social cognition and social signal production with surprising similarities to those producing human by: Brain imaging reveals neural correlates of human social behavior New findings explore how behaviors such as empathy and team flow are represented in the brain.

    We are conducting a longitudinal study in intact marmosets followed from middle-aged to old age to determine the neural correlates of sex differences in age-related cognitive decline. ). Baseline cortisol levels and social behavior differ as a function of inhibition on the brain and behavior in a non-human primate. J Neurosci. doi. Start studying Chapter 9 Nonhuman Primate Behavior. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

    Social behavior is behavior among two or more organisms within the same species, and encompasses any behavior in which one member affects the other. This is due to an interaction among those members. Social behavior can be seen as similar to an exchange of goods, with the expectation that when you give, you will receive the same.   Behavioral and neural correlates of hide-and-seek in rats. Annika Stefanie Reinhold 1, *, which have been intensely investigated in nonhuman primates (11, 12) and children, but not in rodents. The neurobiology of social play behavior in by: 6.


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Neural correlates of social behavior in nonhuman primates by Jean Balch Williams Download PDF EPUB FB2

The neural correlates of action understanding in non-human primates. Leonardo Fogassi Vittorio Gallese. Neuronal Correlates of Empathy: From Rodent to Human explores the neurobiology behind emotional contagion, compassionate behaviors and the similarities in rodents and human and non-human primates.

The book provides clear and accessible information that avoids anthropomorphisms, reviews the latest research from the literature, and is essential reading for neuroscientists and others studying behavior.

Neuronal Correlates of Empathy: From Rodent to Human explores the neurobiology behind emotional contagion, compassionate behaviors and the similarities in rodents and human and non-human primates.

The book provides clear and accessible information that avoids anthropomorphisms, reviews the latest research from the literature, and is essential reading for neuroscientists and others studying. Social behavior seems likely to depend on homologous neural mechanisms in humans and nonhuman primates.

Novel behaviors can evolve by connecting, repurposing (i.e., shifted to serve a new function), or elaborating upon ancestral mechanisms that originally served a different function (22), and the evolution of social behaviors seems likely to follow this by:   The manuscript examines investigative behavior, as well as maintenance of behavior in nonhuman primates by investigatable rewards and determinants of investigative behavior.

The publication also evaluates the radiation syndrome and field studies. The selection is a dependable reference for readers interested in the behavior of nonhuman Edition: 1. For example, McComb and Semple () found a positive association between vocal repertoire and both group size and grooming rate (a measure of the strength of social bonding between individuals in a group) among non-human primates.

Therefore, there is a need to control for the confounding effect of social group size on vocal repertoire when analysing the relationship between brain architecture and Cited by: 2. Studies of social behavior following localized brain lesions in several species of Old World monkeys suggest there is an anatomical substrate for the maintenance of social bonds.

We ask whether the neural activity of ENs correlates with the behavior of the recorded animal including social interactions. Our method allows the animal to walk to any place on the comb, attend inbound and outbound foragers, join the queen group, visit Cited by: 8.

Behaviorally-relevant sounds such as conspecific vocalizations are often available for only a brief amount of time; thus, goal-directed behavior frequently depends on auditory short-term memory (STM). Neuroethology of primate social behavior. A neuroethological approach to human and nonhuman primate behavior and cognition predicts biological specializations for social life.

Evidence reviewed here indicates that ancestral mechanisms are often duplicated, repurposed, and differentially regulated to support social by: 1. Activity in a network of areas spanning the superior temporal sulcus, dorsomedial frontal cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex is concerned with how nonhuman primates negotiate the social worlds in which they live.

Central aspects of these circuits are retained in humans. Activity in these areas codes for primates’ interactions with one another, their attempts to find out about one another. Social behavior seems likely to depend on homologous neural mechanisms in humans and nonhuman primates (21).

Novel behaviors can evolve by connecting, repurposing (i.e., shifted to serve a new function), or elaborating upon ancestral mechanisms that originally served a different function (22), and the evolutionCited by: Tools, terms, and telencephalons: Neural correlates of “complex’ and “intelligent” behavior - Volume 12 Issue 3 - Marc BekoffCited by: 1.

The prefrontal cortex of primates is well poised for carrying out multiple types of functions related to strategic decision-making. For example, outcomes of many strategic decisions can be observed only after substantial : Hyojung Seo, Soyoun Kim, Xinying Cai, Hiroshi Abe, Christopher H.

Donahue, Daeyeol Lee. Development of Social Behavior groups all mediate multifarious effects on the rate and form of lifelong behavioral development occurring in natural primate populations (Altmann and Altmann ). Conse­ quently, we begin our review with a sketch of the diverse physical and social worlds within which primate development occurs.

Primates on primates;: Approaches to the analysis of nonhuman primate social behavior Paperback – by Duane D Quiatt (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Paperback "Please retry" Author: Duane D. Quiatt. Decision making in a social group has two distinguishing features.

First, humans and other animals routinely alter their behavior in response to changes in their physical and social Cited by:   Neural Correlates of Fast Pupil Dilation in Nonhuman Primates: Relation to Behavioral Performance and Cognitive Workload R.E.

Hampson, Ioan Opris, and S.A. Deadwyler Department of Physiology & Pharmacology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC Cited by: Neuronal Correlates of Empathy: From Rodent to Human explores the neurobiology behind emotional contagion, compassionate behaviors and the similarities in rodents and human and non-human primates.

The book provides clear and accessible information that avoids anthropomorphisms, reviews the latest research from the literature, and is essential reading for neuroscientists and others studying Format: Paperback.

A Study of Social Behaviors of Human and Nonhuman Primate Groups The purpose of this study is to observe the social behaviors of both human and nonhuman primates, and to produce results that will effectively illustrate the parallels drawn between physical interactions of these groups.

author of Primate Behavior. This book was also an. Self-Awareness and Social Cognition. PDF ( KB) The Evolution of Human Mindreading: How Nonhuman Primates Can Inform Social Cognitive Neuroscience.

Laurie R. Santos, Jonathan I. Flombaum, and Webb Phillips. PDF ( KB) Social Cognition and the Evolution of Self-Awareness.

Farah Focquaert and Steven M. Platek. PDF ( KB) () Shepherd, Freiwald. Neuron. All primates communicate. To dissect the neural circuits of social communication, we used fMRI to map non-human primate brain regions for social perception, second-person (interactive) social cognition, and orofacial movement generation.

Face perception, second- Cited by:   Social behavior seems likely to depend on homologous neural mechanisms in humans and nonhuman primates. Novel behaviors can evolve by connecting, repurposing (i.e., shifted to serve a new function), or elaborating upon ancestral mechanisms that originally served a different function (22), and the evolution of social behaviors seems likely to Cited by: